Geography

Geographers have a wide-ranging combination of skills which draw in ideas from many sources. This ability to view issues from a wider perspective is appropriate for working and studying in many different areas.

 


KS3

In Key Stage 3 (Years 7 and 8), students will explore what Geography is and the skills needed to understand both the physical and human sides. In Year 7 students examine a number of Physical Geography topics. They include; Poles Apart, Extreme Weather and Tropical Rainforests. Students will also explore a variety of different Human Geography topics, such as Personal Geography, Settlement and Map work. Each of these topics enable students to develop a variety of skills, such as analytical, interpretative and evaluative skills. In Year 8, students again focus on a variety of topics in both the physical and human environment. Topics which will be covered include; Plate Tectonics, the Geography of Sport, Migration and Rivers.

 


KS4

In Key Stage 3 (Years 7 and 8), students will explore what Geography is and the skills needed to understand both the physical and human sides. In Year 7 students examine a number of Physical Geography topics. They include; Poles Apart, Extreme Weather and Tropical Rainforests. Students will also explore a variety of different Human Geography topics, such as Personal Geography, Settlement and Map work. Each of these topics enable students to develop a variety of skills, such as analytical, interpretative and evaluative skills. In Year 8, students again focus on a variety of topics in both the physical and human environment. Topics which will be covered include; Plate Tectonics, the Geography of Sport, Migration and Rivers.

The course consists of four units of Geographical Investigation:

 

  • Dynamic Planet
  • People and Planet
  • Making Geographical Decisions
  • Researching Geography

 

Within each unit, there are a number of core and optional topics which will be chosen by their relevance and interest to the students. Dynamic Planet comprises of topics which focus on the natural environment. During Key Stage 4, students will examine topics such as Rivers, Coasts and Plate Tectonics. People and the Planet focuses on the human geography element of this course. Topics include; Population, Economic Development and Settlement. Over the course of the three year programme, students will also develop a range of geographical skills. These include; interpreting Ordnance Survey maps, constructing and interpreting graphs, charts and maps and learning how to use GIS (Geographical Information Systems. As part of the Edexcel examination board, students will also have to complete a Fieldwork Project. This project is worth 25% of students overall GCSE Geography result.


Enrichment Activities

In Year 7, while students are studying the topic of Tropical Rainforests, we often ask the “Rainforest Roadshow” to come in and visit our lessons. The Rainforest Roadshow is a company designed to bring tropical animals/reptiles into the school environment and educate students about these animals.

Students will be given the opportunity to purchase a quarterly publication from the ‘Geographical Association’ called ‘Geography Review’. This magazine includes case studies and activities to promote independent learning and bring geography alive. Students will be expected to undertake their own independent study into the subject and read and investigate geographical issues away from the classroom. Full support will be given to parents and guardians as to how best to provide support to students during the course.

Students in Years 9 and 10 will be given the opportunity to go on a Fieldtrip to Box Hill in Surrey during the summer term of 2015. During this trip, students will examine the impacts that tourists have had on this area. A range of different methods of data collection will be used during the trip. Students will carry out an Environmental Impact Assessment on three areas in Box Hill and they will conduct a range of experiments, such as measuring the infiltration rate of the soil and examining the “trampling effect”.